Jesus Gives Thanks

The Apostle John writes his gospel narrative that his readers may believe that “Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name” (20:31).  In demonstrating that Jesus is the long awaited Messiah, the Son of God, John often points to the glory seen in Jesus, beginning with what he says in 1:14.

Then we read in 2:11 that when Jesus performed his first miracle, turning water to wine, it was an opportunity for his to reveal his glory.  This is what John tells us.

But in another miracle, the raising of Lazarus from the dead, we find Jesus being preoccupied with the glory of the Father and his own glory.

When he heard this, Jesus said, “This sickness will not end in death. No, it is for God’s glory so that God’s Son may be glorified through it.” (11:4 NIV84, emphasis added)

Lazarus dies.  There’s mourning and weeping.  Even God weeps (v.35).

Jesus comes to the tomb and instructs, “Take away the sone.”  The stone is removed from the tomb.

So they took away the stone. Then Jesus looked up and said, “Father, I thank you that you have heard me. I knew that you always hear me, but I said this for the benefit of the people standing here, that they may believe that you sent me.”  (vv. 41-42, emphasis added)

Jesus’ desire for the display of his and the Father’s glory, note, is for our human good: “that they may believe that you sent me.

This Thanksgiving, as you and your family reflect on what to be thankful for, remember this: God’s display of his glory is for the good of humanity.

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2 Responses to Jesus Gives Thanks

  1. Bobby Grow says:

    It’s amazing that God’s glory in Christ in the Gospel of John is tied to his death and self-givenness. The God who is truly for us who is with us (Immanuel). Amen! Something we can truly be thankful for! Happy Thanksgiving, TC.

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