Sam Storms is what…?

In his own words, Sam Storms says,

I am an Amillennial, Calvinistic, charismatic, credo-baptistic, complementarian, Christian Hedonist…”

I’m currently reading his Kingdom Come: The Amillennial Alternative.  When I’m reading someone for the first time, I like to learn as much about that person as possible–so I decided to visit samstorms.com, and the above is what I extracted.

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This entry was posted in Amillennialism, Calvinism, Charismatic, Complementarian, Sam Storms and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Sam Storms is what…?

  1. Brian LePort says:

    I may need to plug that into Google translate to make any sense of it.

  2. Jon Hughes says:

    I wonder what he orders when he goes into Starbucks? 😉

    • TC says:

      “Double Cappuccino, half-caf, not-fat milk, with just enough foam to be aesthetically pleasing but not so much that it leaves a moustache…” –Niles Crane

      • Jon Hughes says:

        Zondervan are bringing out a Four Views book. In addition to the above position, John Piper argues that lattes are the way to go; John MacArthur (surprisingly) defends the soya milk alternative; and R.C. Sproul presents a full-orbed, full-fat, double-shot view that he admits is ‘hard on the flesh’…

  3. TC says:

    Jon, you had me on that one… 😉

  4. Simon says:

    In other words, Sam Storms is not an orthodox Christian. He is quite clearly heterodox

  5. Simon says:

    Yes and no… credo-baptist beliefs are clearly unorthodox. Credo baptism grew out of the Anabaptist movement. Literally, Anabaptist means to baptise again – clearly opposed to the Scriptures and the Creed, both state that there is only one baptism. As is Calvinism, particularly if you want to be dogmatic about Calvinistic doctrine. I think it would be a different matter if Calvinism was a speculation and not required to be held to dogmatically. But the elevation to Calvinism to the level of dogma is extremely problematic and unwarranted. Christian Hedonism is simply a doctrinal innovation. Amillenialism is orthodox. He holds to the Trinity and probably to orthodox Christology – although he likely rejects the title Theotokos for Mary (despite the fact that this has always been part and parcel of orthodox Christian teaching on Christ). These parts are definitely orthodox. In short, he’s an American evangelical. What can I say? Former evangelical now RC and NYT columnist Ross Douthat has labled America as a nation of heretics. I don’t know if I’d go that far. I would say that most of American Christianity is heterodox. There are definitely orthodox parts to Storms’ beliefs. But there are clearly heterodox parts too. This being measured by the dogmatic proclamations of the Church in the first millenium of the Christian era.That is what I’m going by. I’m not just chucking the heterodox label out there. It can be demonstrated by any measure of orthodoxy.

    • TC says:

      As you know, we only hold to three of the ancient creeds. I believe you’re using “heterodox” to loosely, or maybe not. By your use of “heterodox” you are condemning quite a great deal of the Body of Christ through the ages. But of course you beg to differ. I can never take such an approach on these secondary issues, my friend. I take my lead from a text from Romans 14.

      • Simon says:

        TC, I understand where you are coming from. The label “heterodox” can apply to any group depending on who is making that allegation. So for conservative evangelicals, I’m sure the Catholics and Orthodox are heterodox, if not heretics.

        Yes I do think the term “heterodox” applies to much of Protestant Christendom, though Protestantism is much smaller than both RC and EO and not that much bigger than Oriental Orthodox. However, I don’t think that term is necessarily a condemnation (as opposed to the label “heretic”). I think most other Christian traditions would recognise Protestants as fellow Christian brothers and sisters. It’s just that not all of their beliefs and practises are orthodox measured by the Councils and Creeds. That’s all I was saying. I think some of the Reformed overstate their orthodoxy. But, of course, they think they are absolutely correct about the incorrectness of Catholics, so they wouldn’t think of themselves as heterodox. No group would consider themselves heterdox or heretics. I suppose the question then is: How do we know? For me there are four Christian traditions that can clearly demonstrate Apostolic heritage (Roman Catholic, Anglicanism – especially high church, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox). That is, they inherit essentially the same faith AND practise. This is how I look at it. I have given up on sola scriptura being the sole determinant of apostolic faithfulness for reasons that are well known. That said, to the extent that Protestants subscribe to the Trinity and to orthodox Christology, they clearly demonstrate that they also hold to a common faith.

  6. Jon Hughes says:

    TC and Simon,

    This is a really juicy theological discussion – one that I really enjoy getting stuck into, with the (hopefully) maturing realization that I don’t have all the answers like I used to.

    What’s fascinating is that even fellow conservative evangelicals can and do disagree with every one of Storms’ classifications using Scripture itself. Hence the weakness of evangelicalism and the strength of Simon’s tradition!

    That said, I’m an evangelical, and am both appreciative AND amused by Storms’ self-identification, which continues to remind me of a highly individualistic Starbucks order 🙂

    He surely must have borrowed the term “Christian Hedonist” from John Piper. I struggle here because it comes across as though his spirituality is a ‘drug’ with which he operates on a continually pleasurable high. This is particularly distasteful when his Calvinism renders a whole mass of humanity, for whom Christ didn’t die, damned to the glory of God. (Nothing pleasurable about that.)

    As for baptism, Simon, I’m an Anabaptist in that I was christened as a baby for cultural reasons by unbelieving parents. I make no apology for following Christ in baptism as a believer aged 27 in 1998. I couldn’t do anything else! That WAS my baptism…

    • TC says:

      Jon, in my daily reading of the book of Psalms I read 32:11 this morning, “Be glad in the Lord, and rejoice, O righteous, and shout for joy, all you upright in heart!” I said to myself, this is what Christian hedonist is at its foundation.

      Regarding Simon’s tradition, of course it appears fail-proof, because it’s a tradition unto itself, unaffected by the many disputes of evangelicals and the Free Church movement, which by the way is not a true test of orthodoxy.

  7. TC says:

    I suppose the question then is: How do we know? For me there are four Christian traditions that can clearly demonstrate Apostolic heritage (Roman Catholic, Anglicanism – especially high church, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox). That is, they inherit essentially the same faith AND practise. This is how I look at it. I have given up on sola scriptura being the sole determinant of apostolic faithfulness for reasons that are well known. That said, to the extent that Protestants subscribe to the Trinity and to orthodox Christology, they clearly demonstrate that they also hold to a common faith.

    Simon,

    Thanks for clarifying. I wasn’t sure where you were coming from. As you know, in a discussion like this, we need to get out terms clearly across. 😉

    Well, sorry we Protestants don’t hold to the same councils as you do, and of course there is a reason for such.

    When all is said and done, there is enough room in the kingdom for all of us.

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