Jesus Loves Gays Too: A Response to Wheaton Students’ Protest

The Jesus I’m getting to know in Scripture would never protest the way these Wheaton College students have.

Jesus loves gays, homosexuals, and the LGBT community.  He is not  homophobic.  Do you imagine Jesus standing with a sign protesting and picketing?  Do you?

We continue to be known for what we are against.  This needs to change.  Where is the love in all this protest?

These Wheaton College students need Jesus and his gospel.  Read story here

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13 Responses to Jesus Loves Gays Too: A Response to Wheaton Students’ Protest

  1. R. Mansfield says:

    Note what the students were actually protesting against. They did not like the speaker’s conversion testimony about moving from homosexuality to heterosexuality. For this kind of protest to happen at Wheaton really shows how much the student body mindset has changed–and I don’t mean for the better.

    • TC says:

      Yes, even Dough Wilson chimes in, questioning the disciplining of Wheaton College to allow this. See here

      • Jon Hughes says:

        Am I missing something here? Isn’t part of their protest that not all lesbian/gay Christians experience miraculous changes of sexuality. Some have to live with who they are and experience the loneliness and self-denial that comes with that.

        If that’s how Rosaria Butterfield’s presentation came across, these students have my sympathy and greatest respect for taking a stand against such a perception.

  2. ephnielson says:

    I just wrote on this same issue today. I don’t think God should have a problem with something God created.

    • R. Mansfield says:

      So maybe God has no problem with my tendency toward gluttony?

      • Jon Hughes says:

        The problem is that we don’t really preach against gluttony, do we? Otherwise there wouldn’t be so many supersize me evangelicals lumbering around. No, we’re quite comfortable in our self-indulgent, ‘Christianity-lite’ lifestyles. As we praise-the-Lord-and-pass-the-popcorn, we get indignant about homosexualality – there’s a REAL sin.

        Shame on us for the way we’ve allowed ourselves to be perceived as homophobic. We’ve played into the hands of our detractors on this issue, and haven’t been at all wise.

  3. Craig Benno says:

    It saddens me to find that our churches (sweeping statement) tend to preach morality and not Christ. It’s my experience that when people experience Christs love for themselves, its the love of Christ that changes people.

    • TC says:

      Jon: good point.

      Craig: “It saddens me to find that our churches (sweeping statement) tend to preach morality and not Christ. It’s my experience that when people experience Christs love for themselves, its the love of Christ that changes people.”

  4. TC says:

    Jon,

    I don’t think you are missing anything here. Read the latest part of the article, which is a excerpt from Butterfield.

    May it not have been addressed in a more appropriate manner?

    • Jon Hughes says:

      Yes, Butterfield is saying that sexual orientation is not fixed. Clearly, large numbers of young Christians who are lesbian or gay would beg to differ. Presumably, they were irritated by yet another ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution to problems of a Christian nature, and wanted to passionately and peacefully voice their disagreement.

      As for Douglas Wilson’s piece, perhaps we should all man up and grow a big beard like him 😉

      • TC says:

        Makes sense.

      • R. Mansfield says:

        But it also seems that many who have claimed a same-sex designation are horrified at the idea that perhaps sexual orientation may not (always) be fixed. Many are not even open to exploring the idea because they have so identified with their orientation. Clearly such things are complex. Moreover they are extremely personal, and like most I would admit that the church has not always responded appropriately.

        But I simply don’t buy this “God made me this way, and therefore, it’s okay.” There are lots of ways in which people are born “outside the norm” because we live in a fallen world–but that doesn’t make it the norm. The person born blind doesn’t ignore the fact that he or she is blind, but at the same time does not state that being blind is the norm. In fact, the blind person spends all of his or her life working around the fact of blindness, and very few who are blind would not accept the ability to have sight if it were made possible.

        But let’s take it to a different struggle. I’ve struggled all my life with gluttony and have been overweight for much of my life. It’s very easy for someone to say to me, “Just don’t eat those foods” or “Get more exercise.” I am willing to take responsibility for myself, including any food I put into my body, but in the end it’s more complicated than that. I’ve heard nutritionists speak of a “trigger” in the stomach that tells the brain that it’s full, so the person can stop eating. I swear I’ve never had that trigger. An all-you-can-eat buffet for me is like an unattended open bar for an alcoholic. Left to myself, I will have no trigger to tell me when to stop; I will stop when I’m simply so miserably full, I cannot eat anymore. My wife knows to portion out snacks into small bags for me, because if I get the entire package, I will eat all of it.

        Now, I can easily say that I was born that way. Looking back to my childhood, when these habits seem to have always been there, I think I may really have been born that way. But I dare not give into it! I dare not say, “Hey, this is the way God made me; I’ll eat what I want and how much I want, and it’s all okay!” To do so leads only to death. And it’s a very complex struggle. The alcoholic or drug addict can work to keep away from contexts in which he or she will be tempted, but I have to eat. My addiction is always before me; every meal is a battle. Sometimes I win, but sometimes I lose.

        And I refuse to say that God wants me to give into what I cannot help and do what I want–to be who I am, how He “made” me. I will not say that overeating is the intended norm for me. I will continue to struggle against it, knowing that it will probably be a lifelong struggle. At least for today…today I am winning.

        So, I have no doubt about the homosexual’s struggle. I am certain it is real, and it is often misunderstood. But it is not the norm. It is not God’s intention. No one will ever be able to convince me that God will smile on a committed same-sex relationship, regardless of whether the adherents claim to be Christian or even if there’s a piece of paper stating that the union is legal.

        For the person who identifies with same-sex attraction, that person needs to be at least -open- to the idea that with God’s power, it may be possible to change (just as I need to be accepting of the idea that with God’s power, it may be possible to overcome my tendency toward gluttony). But even if there is not a change, the committed Christian who struggles with this, must continue to struggle and refuse to give up the war, even if at times he or she loses specific battles.

  5. TC says:

    Rick said:

    “So, I have no doubt about the homosexual’s struggle. I am certain it is real, and it is often misunderstood. But it is not the norm. It is not God’s intention. No one will ever be able to convince me that God will smile on a committed same-sex relationship, regardless of whether the adherents claim to be Christian or even if there’s a piece of paper stating that the union is legal.

    For the person who identifies with same-sex attraction, that person needs to be at least -open- to the idea that with God’s power, it may be possible to change (just as I need to be accepting of the idea that with God’s power, it may be possible to overcome my tendency toward gluttony). But even if there is not a change, the committed Christian who struggles with this, must continue to struggle and refuse to give up the war, even if at times he or she loses specific battles.”

    Rick, this is pastoral care. Thanks.

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